Corvus: How to avoid the queues

Posted by Sam Harrison on July 24, 2013 at 08:05.

 Mountaineering and climbing

bivvy borrowdale climbing corvus lake district multi-pitch

How to avoid the queues on one of the Lakes' most popular multipitches? By bivvying, of course! If you've read my last few posts you'll have seen a recent trend of making the most of this fantastic weather we've been having recently, whilst get in some quality Alps training. Lorna and me were joined by Mouse, Calum and Sarah for a weekend in Borrowdale.

The weekend started off on the Saturday with a hot and sweaty slog up Sour Milk Gill to gain the summit of Green Gable. The plan for the day: A 20km semi-horseshoe over Green Gable, Brandreth and Grey Knotts, before descending to Buttermere and reascending to return via Robinson, Hindscarth and Dale Head. The toughest part was, as expected, the drag back up from Buttermere to Robinson. We decided to take the steep path skirting east of Goat Crag to gain the summit directly, and it really was quite tortuous in the intense afternoon sun. We had the summits to ourselves (except for a passing Bob Graham round heading the other direction) and it soon became worth all the effort.
 
Buttermere from Fleetwith Pike
Buttermere from Fleetwith Pike


Back at the car park in Seatoller, we had our tea and packed our bags with climbing gear, before setting off for the 2km walk-in up Combe Gill to the base of Raven Crag. As was expected, the bivvy was particularly midgey, but this time I was armed with a midge net and so had a much more comfortable night than last weekend.
 
Mouse's midge-proof bivvy setup
Mouse's midge-proof bivvy setup


We were up early, and were greeted by a fantastic cloud inversion as we made our way up to the base of the climb (Corvus, D***), which we arrived at for 7am. Me and Lorna took alternate leads, whilst Mouse led the other two up behind us. I lead the first pitch, which after a few delicate traversing moves at the top led nicely onto a damp ledge for the belay. Lorna took over for pitch two - a groove that took a little bit of tought - before I combined three and four together. Pitch three was a scrambling traverse left-wards across the crag, whilst pitch four was back in the vertical with an awkward chimney graced with hand-holds aplenty - a bit of a squeeze with a rucksack on! Lorna took over once more for pitch five, which this time was a right-wards scrambling traverse, and that left me with the fantastic and (in)famous Hand Traverse pitch - a 10m traverse on a vertical wall with fantastic hand holds but a bit lacking in the footholds. I teetered my way off the belay ledge and onto the traverse, placing a nut pretty much straight away. The next few moves were a bit bare on gear, before a good ledge-like foothold was reached with a couple of great cam placements above (I was glad I took the advice of the guide I had read that recommended taking cams). The final few moves of the traverse again didn't have any decent footholds to speak of, and after pulling myself up onto the next belay ledge my arms breathed a sigh of relief. I decided to belay there so I could lean out an take a few photos of Lorna making the traverse - which has equally as severe consequences for the second as it does for the leader. Lorna combined the next few pitches together, and we were soon at the top of the crag, basking in the bright morning sunlight whilst sorting out our gear.
 
The cloud inversion burning off in the early-morning sun
The cloud inversion burning off in the early-morning sun
 
The climb (Corvus, D***), which takes a devious route up Raven Crag
The climb (Corvus, D***), which takes a devious route up Raven Crag
 
The fantastic Hand Traverse pitch (on that good foothold I was talking about)
The fantastic Hand Traverse pitch (on that good foothold I was talking about)
 
Lorna following me over the Hand Traverse
Lorna following me over the Hand Traverse


The climb deserves every one of its three stars, and the Hand Traverse more than makes up for the broken-up nature of actual climbing pitches. We headed down over Thonrythwaite Fell, descending steeply eastwards off the its northern ridge to collect our bivvy gear. Setting off early was definitely the right choice, as we could see many other groups on the route which we'd had to ourselves.

P.S. Did you know? "Corvus" translates to "Raven", and the climb is on Raven Crag.
Comments powered by Disqus