Vanoise: Dome de Sonnailles

Posted by Sam Harrison on August 21, 2013 at 16:57.

 Mountaineering and climbing

alpine mountaineering alps pralognan vanoise

With the weather still firmly in check after Pointe de la Réchasse, we decided to take a rest day before our next summit attempt. So, it was in the intense mid-afternoon sun that Friday brought that we found ourselves making the steep and relentless ascent to the Refuge de la Vallette for the Dome de Sonnailles (PD) the following day. The weather forecast was for "unseasonably hot temperatures" of nearly 40C at 1000m, and mid-thirties in Pralognan. Even at 8pm in the evening at the refuge, at an altitude of 2590m, the thermometer in the shade read 25C. It was no surprise then that our bivvy outside it was by far the warmest bivvy I've ever experienced in the Alps!

Our route up was straight from the campsite, through the Foret d'Isertan and via the Pas de l'Ane. The forest brought some welcome shade, but we were soon out into the open on a steep zigzagging path, scrambling our way through the seemingly impassible crags bounding the top of the forest on the map. This devious route brought us out to the more open ground through Pas de l'Ane and west of the Cirque du Petit Marchet, bringing striking views of the surrounding mountains.

Marmot
A marmot takes a fancy to Lorna's leg!


Great views of le Petit Marchet and the rest of the Vanoise
Great views of le Petit Marchet and the rest of the Vanoise


The refuge was in an equally as striking position, commanding brilliant views right down the Prioux valley to the Aiguilles de Peclet and Polset. We were welcomed warmly by the guardian (who was particularly friendly and spoke very good English), and we paid our €3.70 each for the right to bivvy outside and use of the facilities. The refuge was fully kitted out for self-catering folk like us, and we made use of it to boil some water for our couscous. The whole place had a very cosy feel, right down to hand-sewn cushions and decorative wallpaper (it even has hot showers). I have to admit I was a bit disappointed we weren't staying in the refuge! I would definitely recommend making a point of visiting the place if you're in the area.

Refuge de la Valette
Refuge de la Valette. The hut on the right is the dining room and also acts as the refuge d'hiver (winter refuge).


We'd spied out a bit of the route the evening before and so we were confident we knew where we were going when we set off at 4am the next morning. I was soon down to t-shirt and rolled-up trousers as we made our way via a well cairned path up the moraines. At around 3000m we eventually reached a steep snow slope (about 35 degrees) that lead up to another patch of scree and boulders and finally the glacier to the rocky summit. The snow was extremely soft, but I still thoroughly enjoyed the slope, which gave the route a proper "mountaineeringy" feeling and probably is what warrants the grade of PD (Peu Difficile).

Early morning on the snow slopes up Dome de Sonnailles
Early morning on the snow slopes up Dome de Sonnailles


An early-morning band of rain passed through just as we were reaching the summit, and we had a few short showers and general drizzle, along with a lot of atmospheric clouds swirling around our summit and neighbouring ones. It all made for very dramatic lighting and it was quite a novel experience to be in bad weather on an Alpine summit - something which is usually to be avoided! After a bit of a walk on the Glacier de la Vanoise, we headed back down before the sun hit the already soft snow to make it more unstable. We were the only ones up on the summit, and we didn't see anyone else until we were nearly back at the refuge at around 10am, when two others passing us heading for the summit asked how the route was.

Dramatic clouds
Dramatic clouds


Summit of Dome de Sonnailles
Myself on the summit of Dome de Sonnailles


On the Glacier de la Vanoise, with Dome de Sonnailles in the background.
On the Glacier de la Vanoise, with Dome de Sonnailles in the background.


We picked our bivvy gear up from the refuge, and had a coffee and Orangina whilst enjoying the fantastic views. The route down we chose was different to the one we ascended on; via les Béveriers, les Prioux and the long road back to Pralognan.

Back at the campsite
Back at the campsite
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